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12+ months: Running PDF Print E-mail
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Tuesday, 17 January 2012 02:19

Greater than 12 months: Running

Description

Watch progression to run until running is achieved; watch for unusually frequent falls; ask about any concerns with walking, running, or frequent falls at all visits after milestone is achieved.

What do the effects of weakness in gait look like?

Discussion

A child who does not run at 20 months: monitor closely and communicate concerns to the family and referring provider. Particularly note the quality of running, especially if there are other motor concerns.

Tip: A true run means that both feet are off the floor simultaneously. If a child is attempting to run and is using a fast walk instead, his compensations will be exaggerated—e.g., he will pump/move arms for momentum and arch his back more, use a wider base of support, and will not be able to carry objects or drop objects while running.

RED FLAG

A child who does not run at 24 months, or shows regression in ability to run, needs further evaluation.

Therapist Response to Red Flag

Communicate specific concerns about running (in context of overall development and relevant environmental factors) to the family and referring provider. Provide evidence for weakness rather than poor coordination as a cause for the delay. Encourage a referral to a specialist (consider pediatric neurology) for a diagnostic evaluation.

Specialist Response to Red Flag

Draw a CK and refer for diagnostic workup.

Download a pdf of the Surveillance and Referral Aid for Therapists and Specialists. This Aid includes signs of weakness by age, red flags and warning signs for muscle weakness, and referral recommendations.
Last Updated on Sunday, 31 March 2013 00:07
 

Did you know?

Signs of proximal muscle weakness include: abdominal breathing or accessory muscle use; a feeling of "slipping through hands" when held suspended by examiner under armpits; inability to voluntarily flex neck when supine or head lag when pulled to sit; difficulty rising from floor (including Gowers maneuver, full or modified)
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